Innovative LC-1 Wideband

My LC-1 had 7 wires. In the manual it discusses a slightly different install for the 6 wire version.

Brief breakdown of the wiring:


obd2a pinout table

LC-1 Side: Car Side:

Red (12v power)

A11 - power wire (yellow /black stripe wire)

Blue (heater ground)

Wired to chassis

White (System ground)

A9 - ecu ground - (brown /black stripe wire)

Yellow (Analog output 1 - narrowband)

D7 - o2 sensor wire - (thick solid white)(if you want narrowband o2 output)

Brown (Analog output 2 - wideband)

D7 - o2 sensor wire - (thick solid white)(when dataloging wideband/tuning)

Green (Analog ground)

A9 - ecu ground - (brown /black stripe wire)

Black (Calibration wire)

Wired to chassis



obd1 pinout table

LC-1 Side: Car Side:

Red (12v power)

A25 - power wire (yellow /black stripe wire)

Blue (heater ground)

Wired to chassis

White (System ground)

A26 - ecu ground - (black /red stripe wire)

Yellow (Analog output 1 - narrowband)

D14 - o2 sensor wire - (thick solid white)(if you want narrowband o2 output)

Brown (Analog output 2 - wideband)

D14 - o2 sensor wire - (thick solid white)(when dataloging wideband/tuning)

Green (Analog ground)

A26 - ecu ground - (black /red stripe wire)

Black (Calibration wire)

Wired to chassis



NOTE: Do not wire both the yellow and the brown wire at the same time. You switch between them as you need. So, wire in the brown wire when tuning, and then the yellow wire if you are using the wideband to replace the stock o2 permanantly.

Install steps:

Unplug primary o2 sensor

Remove primary o2 sensor(if you don't have a wideband bung installed)

Run all 7 wires plus the two serial connections through the firewall and into the passanger seat area

Go back to the engine bay and find a secure place to zip tie the control unit.

Red (12v power). Wire this to A11(yellow /black strip wire) at the ecu. This is the ecu power wire.

Blue (heater ground). Wire this to your chassis. Wire on a eye fitting and secure it to a clean,sanded point on the chassis.

White (System ground). Wire this to A9(brown /black stripe wire). This is the ecu ground. The green lc-1 wire is also wired here

Yellow - this wire is the narrowband o2 analog output. It is preset to 0-1v like a normal o2 sensor. If you want have your wideband replace your stock o2 sensor you will connect this to D7 - o2 sensor wire (thick solid white). The same wire as the brown LC-1 wire connects to


Brown - This is analog output 2. It is the wideband 0-5v wire. You will wire this to D7 - o2 sensor wire (thick solid white) when you are tuning. Do not connect both yellow and brown LC-1 wires at the same time, you will switch between them as you need.

Green (Analog ground). Wire this to A9(brown /black stripe wire). This is the ecu ground. The white lc-1 wire is also wired here

Black (Calibration wire). Solder the red wire from the led to it. Then wire an eye fitting and secure it to a clean, sanded point on the chassis. Optionally you can wire the momentary push-button switch but you only need that if you want to recalibrate the wideband. Recalibration is only necessary after the first 3 months, and then every 6 months after that.

Connect the serial terminator plug to the connector marked "Serial In"

Connect the RS232 serial cable to the connector marked "Serial Out". You will use this to program the outputs of the lc-1. You can also use it to log afr directly from the lc-1. For convenience, i have a RS-232 to USB converter attached also.


Finally, a bit cleaned up :D


First Time Use:

1. Do not connect the sensor yet.

2. Switch 12V supply to the LC-1 on and wait for 10 seconds.

3. Switch the 12V supply off after 10 seconds.

4. Connect the sensor to the sensor interface connector. The sensor must be exposed to air for the first time calibration.

5. Switch the LC-1 on and wait for 2 minutes.

If you connected a LED to the calibration button, you will at first see the LED blink slowly and steadily. If it blinks for a fixed number of pulses, then switches off for 2 seconds and then repeats, you have an error code.

Slow and steady blinking indicates that the sensor is warming up to its optimum operating temperature. The warm-up period will last for about 30 seconds for a cold sensor, depending on the sensor type used.

After the sensor is warmed up the meter automatically calibrates the sensor heater controller to the particular sensor. During this 20-second period the LC-1 collects and calculates sensor specific data required to quickly reach operating temperature in the future. After the first time use the meter will use these values to regulate the sensor's temperature. During the heater calibration the optional LED will blink fast and steady.

After that period the LC-1 will automatically perform a free air calibration. During this 2 second period a connected LED will go off. The LC-1 will now calibrate itself by using air as a reference gas with known oxygen content.

After the free air calibration is finished the LED should light up steady and continuously, indicating correct operation of the LC-1.




Bung choice for LC-1:

As mentioned above, you can use your stock o2 sensor bung to install the lc-1. Or if you are installing a second bung for the lc-1,leave the stock o2 unplugged but still physically in the exhaust and use the following rules:

"On TURBO CHARGED vehicles:

Install the bung downstream from the turbo before the catalytic converter. The high exhaust pressure before the turbo interferes with the lambda measurement and the high exhaust temperatures encountered there can damage the sensor."

Do NOT install the Bung below the 3 o'clock or 9 o'clock position. Condensation can form in the exhaust pipe and permanently damage the sensor. 6 oclock is the absolute worst position to mount the sensor."


Why we reprogram output and datalog through ECU:

Now that all the wiring is done we can get set to datalog the reading through the ecu. The reason we want to datalog through the ecu (wideband analog output(brown wire) wired to white o2 sensor wire) is so that when we view rpm, map, afr etc etc at the same rate. The values are all sampled at exactly the same time. This allows us to tune afr properly based on rpm and map pressure values. The o2 sensor wire however is only setup to read a maximum of 3.8x volts. Our wideband is preset to output from 0v to 5v. So what we must do is reprogram the wideband analog output of the lc-1 so that we can read all the values.



Reprogram Wideband analog output:


Connect the serial cable from the lc-1 to your laptop

Open lmprogrammer

Program Analog output 2(the one that is currently set to 0-5v) to the following:

0.1v = 7.35 afr

3.25v = 22 afr

Click "program" to program the settings.

Close lmprogrammer


Tuning/Logging:

Using whatever software you are tuning with, disable the o2 sensor. Other wise you will have a CEL because we wired the wideband to it. Leaving the serial connection still plugged to the car, Start the car. Open Log Works 2 and click connect. You should now see your current afr.

Using whatever software you will use to datalog(freelog, uberdata, cromepro etc), program the o2 scale to match what we set the lc-1 to.

When you are done tuning you can do one of two things:

1: Completely remove lc-1. Reinstall stock o2 sensor. Reenable o2 sensor in tuning software

2: Remove the brown wideband wire, and wire the yellow analog output wire (simulated narrowband) to the o2 sensor wire (D14 - thick solid white wire). Re-enable o2 sensor in tuning software

Permanant installs are ok, and supposedly have held for 60K miles. For me, i want to preserve the life of my lc-1 so i will most likely remove it completely when i have finished tuning




Calibration schedule:

Turbo car, daily driver (tuned rich):

- Calibrate before installation of new sensor

- Calibrate new sensor again after 3 month of use

- Thereafter calibrate twice a year or every 10,000 miles, whichever comes first


-Luke